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Mississippi Today

Lawmakers may have to return to Capitol May 14 to override Gov. Tate Reeves’ potential vetoes

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mississippitoday.org – Bobby Harrison – 2024-05-10 12:50:25

Legislators might not have much notice on whether they will be called back to the Mississippi Capitol for one final day of the 2024 session.

Speaker Jason White, who presides over the House, and Lt. Gov. Delbert Hosemann, who presides over the Senate, must decide in the coming days whether to reconvene the for one final day in the 2024 session on Tuesday at 1 p.m.

Lawmakers left on May 4. But under the joint resolution passed during the final days of the session, legislators gave themselves the option to return on May 14 unless Hosemann and White “jointly determine that it is not necessary to reconvene.”

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The reason for the possible return on Tuesday presumably is to give the Legislature the opportunity to take up and try to override any veto by Gov. Tate Reeves. The only problem is the final bills passed by the Legislature — more than 30 — are not due action by Reeves until Monday, May 13. And technically the governor has until midnight Monday to veto or sign the bills into or allow them to become law without his signature.

Spokespeople for both Hosemann and White say the governor has committed to taking action on that final batch of bills by Monday at 5 p.m.

“The governor's office has assured us that we will final word on all bills by Monday at 5 p.m.,” a spokesperson for Hosemann said. “In the meantime, we are reminding senators of the possibility of return on Tuesday.”

A spokesperson for White said, “Both the House and Senate expect to have all bills returned from the governor before 5 p.m. on Monday. The lieutenant governor and speaker will then decide if there is a reason to back on May 14.”

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The governor has five days to act on bills after he receives them while legislators are in session, which technically they still are. The final batch of bills were ready for the governor's office one day before they were picked up by Reeves staff. If they had been picked up that day earlier, Reeves would have had to act on them by Saturday.

At times, the governor has avoided picking up the bills. For instance, reporters witnessed the legislative staff attempt to deliver a batch of bills to the governor's Capitol office one day last , but Reeves' staff refused to accept the bills. They were picked up one day later by the governor's staff, though.

Among the bills due Monday is the massive bill that funds various projects throughout the , such as tourism projects and projects. In total, there are more than 325 such projects totaling more than $225 million in the bill.

In the past, the governor has vetoed some of those projects.

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The governor already has taken action of multiple bills passed during the final days of the session.

He a bill to strip some of the power of the Public Employees Retirement System Board to become law without his signature. The bill also committed to providing a 2-and-one-half percent increase in the amount governmental entities contribute to the public employee pension plan over a five year period.

A bill expanding the area within the Capitol Complex Improvement District, located in the of Jackson, also became law without his signature. The CCID receives additional funding from the state for infrastructure projects. A state Capitol Police Force has primary law enforcement jurisdiction in the area.

The governor signed into law earlier this week legislation replacing the long-standing Mississippi Adequate Education Program, which has been the mechanism to send state funds to local schools for their basis operation.

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This article first appeared on Mississippi Today and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

Mississippi Today

6,000 U.S. doctors urge the Supreme Court to keep abortions in medical emergencies legal

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mississippitoday.org – Shefali Luthra, The 19th – 2024-05-22 13:24:05

Originally published by The 19th

Nearly 6,000 doctors, hailing from all 50 states, have drafted a letter asking the Supreme Court to uphold a federal law that requires hospital emergency departments to abortions when they are needed to stabilize .

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The letter, organized by the left-leaning Committee to Protect Care and shared first with The 19th, concerns the case Idaho v. United States, which the high court heard in April.

In that case, the federal has argued that the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act — a 1986 law known as EMTALA — requires that hospitals participating in the federal Medicare program provide abortions if doing so is the necessary treatment in an emergency. Idaho has contested that interpretation, and argued that its state-level abortion ban supersedes federal law. Idaho's current ban allows an exception only if the procedure will save the life of the pregnant person, but not if it will otherwise preserve their health. 

“We know firsthand how complications from pregnancy can very quickly to a medical crisis, requiring immediate care and treatment,” states the letter, which was signed by doctors across specialties whose abilities to provide care could be affected by a ban, oncology, emergency medicine and anesthesiology. “These patients' complications can range from a miscarriage to heavy bleeding, from placental abruption to a stroke from severe preeclampsia – and doctors and health professionals in emergency departments must be allowed to use the full range of medical options to save these patients' lives, including abortion.”

The case is one of two abortion-related challenges the court has heard this term, and one of the first since the overturn of Roe v. Wade in the 2022 Dobbs v. Women's Health Organization. A decision is expected this June. 

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The court has held that, while this case is pending, the federal government cannot enforce EMTALA in Idaho. As a result, patients in the midst of medical emergencies have flown to Utah — the next closest state with abortion access — to treatment.

Abortions that would be covered by EMTALA constitute only a tiny fraction of terminations performed in the United States. Still, the case has sparked tremendous concern among physicians. 

“If someone is a crisis and part of the treatment involves an abortion — or any procedure or intervention that might be deemed an abortion by a prosecutor down the road — that is something we shouldn't have to think about,” said Dr. Rob Davidson, a Michigan-based emergency physician and the committee's executive director. “When I have a pregnant woman having a crisis, my first call should be to an OB, and not a lawyer.”

It's not clear how the Supreme Court will rule, but their decision could have implications well beyond abortion. Already, the fear of violating strict abortion bans has deterred aspiring and practicing physicians from setting up shop in states with such laws — particularly in Idaho, which has seen an exodus of maternal-fetal medicine specialists in the almost two years since Roe's fall. Physicians in the state worry a court finding in favor of Idaho might exacerbate that trend. 

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Legal scholars say that if the court finds EMTALA does not protect abortion as one form of emergency medical care, states could subsequently restrict other treatments — undercutting the law's core holding that patients who present at emergency rooms are guaranteed to at least receive stabilizing treatment.

“The basis of Dobbs is states have the power to regulate medical care. If you extend that to EMTALA, you open up EMTALA to whatever drama a state wants to play out in its emergency rooms,” Sara Rosenbaum, a professor emerita of health law and policy at George Washington University who has written extensively about EMTALA, told The 19th last month.

This could theoretically include prohibiting hospitals from providing emergency care for patients with HIV or substance use disorder — treatment they would ordinarily be required to provide.

“What if someone says, ‘We don't believe in harm reduction programs for opioid use disorder, so we don't think we should provide naloxone kits when patients leave the ER?'” Davidson asks. “This is bad enough that I don't have to imagine what could happen next, or what else they could carve out. But you're opening a Pandora's box.”

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This article first appeared on Mississippi Today and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

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Mississippi Today

FBI raids Hinds County DA’s business, office

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mississippitoday.org – Jerry Mitchell – 2024-05-22 11:01:00

On Wednesday morning, the FBI raided a cigar business owned by District Attorney Jody Owens II as well as his office at the courthouse.

Cigar Company is located just blocks from the Hinds County Courthouse, where Owens serves as prosecutor.

“The FBI is executing federal search warrants at multiple locations,” FBI spokeswoman Marshay Lawson said in a statement. “The affidavit in of the search warrants has been sealed by the court, and so I am prohibited from commenting further. There is no threat to public safety.”

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Owens was not available at his office and did not return emails or phone calls.

This article first appeared on Mississippi Today and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

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Crooked Letter Sports Podcast

Podcast: Tournament time for Mississippi baseball.

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The SEC Tournament is underway in Birmingham. The Sun Belt Tournament has begun in Montgomery. And, closer to home, the MHSAA Tournament has begun at Trustmark in Pearl. The Cleveland have on all of it, but not before Tyler tells his dad, “See, I told you so.”

Stream all episodes here.


This article first appeared on Mississippi Today and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

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